Get In Touch

This site uses cookies and similar technology to function properly and to provide the services present on it, analytical cookies (our own and third party) to understand and improve users’ browsing experience, and profiling cookies (our own and third party) to serve you advertisements in line with preferences displayed while browsing online. For further information, see our Cookie Policy . To refuse consent for some or all cookies, click here. By clicking “I agree”, you consent to the use of the aforementioned cookies.

I agree

Samsung phones recalled

Almost everyone now owns a smartphone. We carry it in our pockets and our bags, some even sleep with it under their pillow. But do we really consider the serious risk of injury they can pose?

Samsung, a well trusted brand, was forced to issue a product recall of its new phone the Note 7 last month amid a number of reports that the faulty batteries made the phone overheat and explode.

Samsung then began the costly exercise of offering replacement phones. However, more complaints have arisen detailing further cases of these mobile phones (even some of the replacement devices) catching fire. Samsung have now insisted consumers to switch off their phones whilst they carry out investigations. They have also ceased production and sales of the Note 7. Many consumers are yet unaware of the recall for the product and they are still being used. US authorities have banned passengers carrying the Samsung device on aircrafts.

Much like the infamous exploding hover-boards and e-cigarettes, phones use lithium ion battery packs for their power, and the liquid swimming around inside most lithium ion batteries is highly flammable. The electronic industry continues to use these batteries as they are small and lightweight.

Why is our safety being ignored when these products are released?

We are often told these faults come from cheap imports and poor quality products. It seems these large corporations are more concerned with branding and public image. One of my current clients sustained a burn to her face after their device overheated and burnt the battery. My call to manufacturers – ‘stop this needless injury – much more needs to be done in the electronic market to ensure the manufacture of phones and batteries are always safe and do not overheat!